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PostPosted: 12 Jan 2018, 14:37 

Joined: 11 Oct 2017, 01:49
Posts: 35
Location: BC Canada
It hasn't been that bad feeding the 5356 030 wire through my little welder. The whip is quite short, and probably is what makes this possible. But overheating the contact tip leads to broken wires and feed issues.

File comment: bird nesting? hah. what a pain.
26694994_10154987075906470_528049002_o.jpg


My buddy has a miller 211 but he's in the next town about an hour away. I'd borrow it, but I'm worried that the longer whip may create more feed issues without a spool gun. So many options. Still eyeing the everlast 185. Can probably buy it, build the boat, and sell it afterwards to keep the cost down. Yeah right, who ever sells a welder without buying a better one first?

See you on the water.

Brian


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PostPosted: 12 Jan 2018, 18:39 

Joined: 13 Nov 2014, 08:01
Posts: 718
Funny that you can rent a backhoe but not a welder.

I was lucky that a relative loaned me his spool gun machine. It still ate tips.

Something I learned - run an oversized contact tip (.045 for ,035 wire) so it doesn't drag as much. I suppose it doesn't transfer as much amps but it cut down on burnbacks.

If it is a one time project, then an option is to rivet it together & take it to a weld shop.


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PostPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 02:37 

Joined: 09 Oct 2017, 20:11
Posts: 25
Outside corner welds are a little more difficult. Get yourself a backer bar/plate made out of copper. a 2"wx6"Lx 1/2" thick bar works best and cut a 45 on one end. your welds especially butt welds will improve tremendously!

Im also flat out shocked that you are getting any of that wire to feed through the "hose". Pushing aluminum wire is is like herding cats


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2018, 01:44 

Joined: 11 Oct 2017, 01:49
Posts: 35
Location: BC Canada
I'm pleasantly surprised by my equipment, especially considering the small amount of practice time. For sure, the welder is near it's limits, all the knobs are at or near maximum. I'll have to make time to practice my aluminum welding over the next few weeks. Can't expect decent results from a novice, so will have to hone the skill set before burning holes in the real thing. Thanks again for the tips and encouragement. I do have a backup plan, if the equipment isn't adequate, I can take the boat to a shop for welding. But being a hands-on kind of guy, really want to make this happen in the garage. With my own hands.

I've finally cleared out enough space in the garage to get the ski inside, so I can get it running properly. If it's not running properly in the ski hull, I fear I'll never get it to run properly. Still, not much to report at this time. I did perform a compression test, which was 125psi on both cylinders, cold engine. Didn't get to check crank case pressure sealing yet.

Pulling the carburetors out to overhaul is a royal pain. The exhaust pipe runs over the carbs, so needs to be removed for access, but it's bolted to everything, and physically surrounds the entire top of the engine. Took a bunch of salty language to disassemble. Hidden bolts and hidden couplers make what appears to be a simple job more difficult than it is. Chalk this up to lack of experience with 2-stroke watercraft.

Thankfully, the carbs look to be in good shape from the outside, and looking through the throats. Now I'm awaiting overhaul kits to arrive in a couple weeks. Thankfully, one of the local shops has a retired yamaha factory bike racing team tech there. Quite likely the diaphragms have failed, and these are the fuel pumps that draw fuel from the tank. They're powered by crank case pulse pressure. Learning quite a bit about 2 stroke stuff.

File comment: carburetors, out on the bench.
26981793_10155004056511470_1971757555_o.jpg


So, while I'm waiting for parts, and for the carbs to be ready, I've been playing with paper models a bit more. Ignore the braces in the middle, they're just for ease of glue up. The overall profile is beginning to take shape.

File comment: simple nose. ignore floor glue-up braces
23222905_10154833200076470_156459580_o.jpg


I've found that wattscraft in New Zealand has a minijet boat intake kit for a reasonable sum of money. But shipping will be a pain. However, they have a business partner in Canada that does their cutting for the North American market. I'm in the process of contacting them about obtaining a jet intake kit.

See you on the water,

Brian


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2018, 09:19 

Joined: 13 Nov 2014, 08:01
Posts: 718
Looks like great progress!

If your welds don't need to be waterproof, then making a bunch of short ones may be easier. I had the problem of heat getting head of me & I would burn a big hole after about 4 inches.

Regarding running the engine out of water, it behaves drastically diferent with no load, won't tell you much. I tested mine by tying boat to traiier extra well & running engine with trailer backed down ramp. Stirs up some mud but much safer than being out in the current.

I had problems with th 'pop-off' springs, made it run bad at midrange. There is a pressure test foir pop off you might want to do.

Good luck.


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2018, 09:20 

Joined: 13 Nov 2014, 08:01
Posts: 718
Looks like great progress!

If your welds don't need to be waterproof, then making a bunch of short ones may be easier. I had the problem of heat getting head of me & I would burn a big hole after about 4 inches.

Regarding running the engine out of water, it behaves drastically different with no load, won't tell you much. I tested mine by tying boat to traiier extra well & running engine with trailer backed down ramp. Stirs up some mud but much safer than being out in the current.

I had problems with th 'pop-off' springs, made it run bad at midrange. There is a pressure test for pop off you might want to do.

Good luck.


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PostPosted: 22 Apr 2018, 00:59 

Joined: 11 Oct 2017, 01:49
Posts: 35
Location: BC Canada
quick update, finally got the carburetors back together, and am installing them back into the waverunner. There's a hose that runs to the top of the bearing in the propshaft, but it's dangling into the bilge. What's it supposed to connect to?

The reed valves look to be in good shape too, so that's a plus. Hope to get the donor waverunner water tested this coming weekend. Will likely rip around with it for a couple weekends to learn to drive it before tearing it apart. What's it cost to have the driveshaft/propshaft shortened and re-splined?

Hoping to get this on the water soon.

Brian


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PostPosted: 22 Apr 2018, 08:27 

Joined: 13 Nov 2014, 08:01
Posts: 718
Green hulk website is a great resource to research your hose question.

Getting a shaft resplined will be very expensive. Why do you need to do that? Some brands have different shaft lengths (2 vs 3 person).

Good luck


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2018, 22:34 
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Joined: 05 Jan 2016, 21:50
Posts: 380
CedarRiverScooter wrote:
Sorry to burst the bubble but no way will a 110V machine do aluminum.

It takes over 150 A into the wire to get penetration.
Agreed!

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: 21 May 2018, 11:48 
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Joined: 02 Jun 2015, 09:56
Posts: 466
Location: Bedford Indiana
Do yourself a favor as I'm sure you will use it plenty on future work, and just pony up the money for a decent 220v welder. Being a hobbiest welder like me you don't need a top notch unit, but it's worth buying a decent one that will last. I bought this exact package around 2 or 3 years ago it's a great little welder I've done a few aluminum projects with the spool gun, and plenty of steel ones with the regular mig gun. I did a whole right up on when I made a transom extension for my boat to go to an outboard jet, and when I added in an additional cross support to my trailer. All of that was done with the little hobart along with lots of other little projects in the garage since. You can't beat it for the price. Sure there are cheaper units, and better ones, but I don't think there are better ones for the money.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools ... _200482227

promo code for 20 bucks off

259025

It's a little heavy being a transformer powered unit vs an inverter powered unit, but I preferred that. Way I saw it my transformer powered lincoln square wave tig machine is still working great, and I bought it used. It's probably around 15-20 years old. Being that you seem like a garage and project junky like all of us I don't think you will regret getting a better welder. I know I haven't regretted having that little hobart mig, wish I had bought it sooner. Way I see it, it should last me a long time one of those buy once cry once things. Maybe I'm weird I have a hard time buying a new phone that cost 700 plus bucks that may last four years before it's crap or obsoleted. The welder was the same money and will probably last me a long time saving me lots of money I would have had to pay for another person to do welding for me.


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PostPosted: 21 May 2018, 14:10 
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Joined: 15 Mar 2014, 16:57
Posts: 1897
Location: CT
Prowelder wrote:
CedarRiverScooter wrote:
Sorry to burst the bubble but no way will a 110V machine do aluminum.

It takes over 150 A into the wire to get penetration.
Agreed!

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk



Forgive me, I'm not an experienced welder by any measure, but would you explain what is wrong with the weld in the OP's practice attempt with 90 degree pieces which appear to my untrained eye to be firmly joined.

I've got a 110v setup I was hoping to use on a framing project using 1/8" materials which I was going to try heating the backside of the metal with a torch and welding on the cleaned surface on the opposite side from where the torch flame made contact.

I think if I'd made joints with a bead laid down looking half as well as his did I'd be ecstatic, and yet you're saying they aren't penetrated far enough?



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PostPosted: 21 May 2018, 18:25 

Joined: 13 Nov 2014, 08:01
Posts: 718
You have made a good point.

Looks like he made it work.


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PostPosted: 22 May 2018, 14:48 
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Joined: 02 Jun 2015, 09:56
Posts: 466
Location: Bedford Indiana
He made some good welds I wasn't knocking them at all. All I did was suggest a welder that would be much more well suited for the job. I'm not a fan of 110 welders outside of sheet metal you usually find their limits pretty quick, the op had found the limits it seems as he has stated he is pretty well maxed it out to weld what he has. It's working but I imagine he would be happier with a 220v machine as has already been looking for one, and I just made a suggestion for a 220v welder that I have, and have been very happy with.


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PostPosted: 23 May 2018, 15:07 
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Joined: 05 Jan 2016, 21:50
Posts: 380
At max capacity you will overheat the machine quickly and eventually cause damage

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: 24 May 2018, 02:56 

Joined: 11 Oct 2017, 01:49
Posts: 35
Location: BC Canada
Guys, I do appreciate all of the tips, and the encouragement.

Project is going much more slowly than I had hoped. Ski doesn't run properly yet, but it does run on both cylinders now. Didn't realize what it was supposed to sound like. More like a motorcycle than a 1cyl chainsaw. lol. When I put it in the water in mid april, it was running on just the rear cylinder. But lacking any jet ski experience, I didn't realize that. I can tell now by the sound :O pulling a plug wire to the front cylinder confirmed that it wasn't firing. So I pulled the carburetor off and took it apart. And put it back together again, and it runs on both cylinders now. I've learned so much, and am realizing how much I have yet to learn.

The engine doesn't idle properly yet, and midrange has a lot to be desired. But full throttle over 4000 rpms and it's in a happy place. Put a big smile on my face. Engine feels strong up top. So mechanically it's sound. Just needs the carbies fixed properly.

The hose going to the driveshaft bearing is a grease hose, and was originally secured to a grease fitting on the expansion chamber of the exhaust. So I put it back where it belongs, and pumped a bunch of grease into it.

Once it's running properly, I'll take the engine out and start the layout process. I haven't purchased my sheet of aluminum quite yet. First, have to lay out, then build the water inlet and grille/strainer. Then order the aluminum, and build a jig/fixture on wheels. Still a ways to go. I'm still hopeful that I can weld it together at home. But haven't really practiced with bigger pieces of aluminum yet.

See you on the water!

Brian


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