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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 11:19 
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Joined: 06 Apr 2009, 21:01
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Location: Cullman AL. (north Central)
Out on the Pacific coast people can raise Oysters and Abalone in Mesh cages, like a Crappie trap.
The Mesh cage stay in the water till they are lifted to harvest or in the case of Abalone, they fill the Cage with Sea Weed and lower it back down.

What else could Fresh water people do for food source raising? :o


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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 12:04 

Joined: 15 Apr 2011, 10:15
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Location: South Mississippi
Dig a pond and stock it :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 13:33 
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Location: Cullman AL. (north Central)
LOL, that's a Land lubber talking about digging a pond. :LOL2:
I spent a few weeks in a summer on my 29' boat in Cook Inlet south of Anchorage AK.
I ate good. Davy Jones has quite a plate to set.

Raising that salt water stuff requires you keep the 'environment' stable. You can't be changing harbors.

Is there any Fresh Water edibles you could raise at anchor?


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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 13:35 
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Joined: 15 Sep 2011, 08:48
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Location: South Carolina (redneck riviera)
Although I live near saltwater on the coast of SC, I've got a small pond in my backyard right now, and I have it stocked with about 2 dozen rainbow trout, as well as 100 juvenile bream, and a few large bream. When the trout are big enough to eat, by next spring, I'll be catching and eating a few here and there.

This is how koi goldfish ponds got started, people in Japan raised them for food, after all, koi are just fancy carp.

If my property were waterfront, I would dig a huge pond, and connect it to the marsh, and I would raise winter trout, red drum, flounder, etc. But, being back one row from the water, means having a closed system, and that means having to do water changes. No problem to drain it out to the ditch by the road, that runs back to the creek. But getting the salt water back into the pond from 150 feet away, across a road, is another issue entirely.



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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 13:43 
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Joined: 06 Apr 2009, 21:01
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Location: Cullman AL. (north Central)
Getting the Salt water in (and out) sounds like something that can be done with a big PVC pipe series.
Or some Ceder fencing made into a Water sluice pipe.
Is that possible?
Clams and Oysters do well in slowly moving water.

You might check with your F&G about this. It's probably been discussed in the past.


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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 15:46 
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Location: South Carolina (redneck riviera)
thudpucker wrote:
Getting the Salt water in (and out) sounds like something that can be done with a big PVC pipe series.
Or some Ceder fencing made into a Water sluice pipe.
Is that possible?


Clams and Oysters do well in slowly moving water.

You might check with your F&G about this. It's probably been discussed in the past.


Well, I know all the local officers with DNR and the Dept of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), so, I've consulted with them on some of these things. It's my understanding that if the pond is actually connected to the creek with a pipe, weir, etc.....then the state of SC has control over that body of water. With my pond, it would pretty much have to be a closed system, because of the distance between me and the creek.

The issue is that there is a road between me and the creek. Granted, it's a dirt road, but that makes it worse....if I tried to bury a pipe, surely, the idiot on the motor grader would clip it. Not a problem to hard-plumb a line with a quick connect fitting at the street, going through my yard, to my pond....but going from the yard, across the street, and then across the neighbor's yard to the creek, is a problem.

Although he said he wouldn't mind me laying a hose across his yard when I needed to do water changes, that's a lot of 2 inch hose to have to lay out and wind up. And as sure as I do, a dozen tourons will ride through the neighborhood, rubber-necking, running over the hose laid across the road.

Maybe one day I will figure out the logistics of how to do it, but for now, I'll stick with my bream and rainbow trout.

As for clam and oyster mariculture, I'm quite familiar with that, it's part of the work I do at one of my numerous jobs.

Right now, we're experimenting with bamboo poles in some back drains in the marsh, documenting spat growth on the poles compared to growth on used oyster shells, in the hopes of convincing my boss that we need to stop wasting money on planting oyster shells with a giant barge, and instead, obtain bamboo poles, where the oyster harvesters can take them out in small boats and place them in precise locations, instead of the random, spray-and-pray method of planting shells, which is really a piss-poor method.

Anyhow, we took video of putting out the poles, and will continue to take video from time to time, to document the progress. Once we have some growth documented, I'll be posting the video to my youtube channel, as well as showing it to my boss, to show him a clarifying example of what I've been trying to explain to him for the past 2 years.

"Blade", or cluster oysters, prefer slower moving water, they grow on mud flats and in back drains where they are protected from current. But the single 'rock oysters' as we call them, often grow in areas of current, near the low water mark.

In general, oysters seem to fare a little better when there are high levels of sediment or algae. Along the banks of my channel, there are oyster mounds a foot and a half high, and that's from the sediment that I kick up as I'm going in and out of the channel at low tide, it's like miracle grow to the oysters.

They previously were not growing in my channel like that, until about 10 years ago, when I started blowing it out with prop wash. I keep adding wire racks, crab pots, used oyster shells, and anything else I can, along the banks, trying to establish more beds. But not for harvesting, as my channel is an area closed due to pollution, unfortunately. :(

Instead, I'm establishing the beds in my channel for erosion control, and as habitat for fish, etc. And so far, it's working. About 2 summers ago, I almost caught a 4 pound trout with my jet ski, coming in at dead low tide. He didn't have anywhere to go, except to the side of the "ditch", which is only about 2 feet deep at low tide, and when he did, he ran up into some shallow water, where I saw his back come out the water. I jumped off the ski and tried to grab him, but he slipped through my hands. #-o That's no tall tale about the one that got away either, that really happened.

As for clams, they seem to prefer the deepest water in drains, and generally prefer a sand/washed shell type of bottom, especially where the washed shells have been broken down into almost a coarse sand.

On a side note about growing clams, I've held 1 million clams at one time, in just 2 bags (they were baby clams, being grown out in an upweller system)



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Watch it all right here:

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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 17:43 
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Joined: 06 Apr 2009, 21:01
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Location: Cullman AL. (north Central)
In Washington state's Hood canal they grow Oysters. The beds used to be public, but now just about all private. Claimed by the Natives I think.

Near Hoonah Alaska, near Juneau, the Natives grow oysters in a barge like structure.

I'm in the middle of nowhere now. I doubt if we could make a garden grow if we used fish cleanings as fertilizer.


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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 19:00 
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Joined: 03 Jan 2011, 12:29
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Location: british columbia canada
you could probably do crayfish,but i don't know if they need moving water or not.most of the mussels up here are farmed.



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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 19:11 
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Location: South Carolina (redneck riviera)
bcbouy wrote:
you could probably do crayfish,but i don't know if they need moving water or not.most of the mussels up here are farmed.



From what I understand, crayfish can practically live in a ditch, but they are generally found in swamps. Water quality for crayfish would not have to be as high as it does with something like rainbow trout.

Mussels actually need a certain amount of detritus, sediment, and algae in order to survive. I've got a freshwater mussel in my trout pond right now, it's been there since July, so, it survived the heat of summer, and apparently, there's enough nutrients in the water to keep it alive.



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Watch it all right here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/HKPSG1Shooter?feature=mhee
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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 21:36 
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Location: Cullman AL. (north Central)
PSG I wish you well with your research! We all need info from people like you.


Salt Water mussels are the first to get the "Red Tide" and the first to get rid of it too.
My only complaint about mussels was it took so many of them to make a snack.

Mud-bugs are a Vegetarian. They live in the Mud, and come up to feed on the tender parts of plants. They will pinch us, but I dont think they eat meat unless it's pretty well deteriorated to mush. They don't need running water, just food n' shelter.
You always find Snakes around the mud-bug ponds. :x


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PostPosted: 02 Nov 2012, 22:40 
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Joined: 15 Sep 2011, 08:48
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Location: South Carolina (redneck riviera)
thudpucker wrote:
PSG I wish you well with your research! We all need info from people like you.



When it comes to shellfish, I know just about as much as much as any biologist in DNR, or any enforcement officer in DNR or DHEC, as I have not only read the laws, etc, but the HACCP regulations that pertain to the handling, transport, storage, and preparation protocols for shellfish sanitation and food safety.

Here's some more info about oysters, and commercial oyster harvesting, it's actually an excerpt from an 18 chapter book I've written. Click this link, it should automatically download a PDF booklet.

21148_Oyster booklet.pdf [446.09 KiB]
Downloaded 54 times



Also, if you check out my youtube channel, you can see a video of me harvesting oysters with Larry The Cable Guy (funny stuff!), as well as another video that shows the process for planting used oyster shells with a barge and high pressure water nozzles.



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ALUMA-JET project:
viewtopic.php?f=21&t=22023


Fishing, jet skiing, target shooting, jet-boating, and even a little oyster harvesting with Larry The Cable Guy.
Watch it all right here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/HKPSG1Shooter?feature=mhee
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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2012, 01:17 

Joined: 19 Jan 2012, 07:44
Posts: 2926
Location: Northeast Arkansas
PSG-1 wrote:
bcbouy wrote:
you could probably do crayfish,but i don't know if they need moving water or not.most of the mussels up here are farmed.



From what I understand, crayfish can practically live in a ditch, but they are generally found in swamps. Water quality for crayfish would not have to be as high as it does with something like rainbow trout.

Mussels actually need a certain amount of detritus, sediment, and algae in order to survive. I've got a freshwater mussel in my trout pond right now, it's been there since July, so, it survived the heat of summer, and apparently, there's enough nutrients in the water to keep it alive.



Crayfish/crawdads do live in ditches and they do it very well as they will multiply rapidly, as long as some farmer doesn't introduce certain chemicals into the water system when he sprays his fields/crops. They are also raised commercially around here, in ponds that avg about 18-24" deep.

As for freshwater muscles, as a young boy we would wade the local rivers and feel for muscles with our bare feet on the muddy bottom as we pulled our boat along. There were days we could almost overload the boat enough to sink it. We sold the muscles to a local buyer for their shells which were used for making buttons. I'm not sure what variety they were but they avg'd about 8" long and 2.5" thick at their max diameter.



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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2012, 10:27 
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Location: Cullman AL. (north Central)
When it rains hard in Southern Louisiana the fisher folk are in the ditches netting up shrimp and mud bugs for bait.
All of it can go in the Gumbo Pot as well.
Yummers.


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