It is currently 24 Sep 2018, 15:55
Join the free forum or login with your account and the annoying banner goes away

BoatCoversDirect

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




 Page 2 of 2 [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2016, 14:03 
Donor
User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2014, 14:32
Posts: 1966
Location: Eastern Mass
Dowellz wrote:
I found a link saying to use 635 thin epoxy with medium hardener. Is that the right stuff? Will 1 quart be enough?

Use Raka epoxy - very cost effective and no expen$ive pumps needed! Simple 2-parts resin to 1-part hardener for most of their mixes. Just be sure to use a WIDE container, like a big tin foil pan with lots of surface area, if/when mixing up a bigger batch. This applies to ANY epoxy mix by the way. Mix too much up in a plastic tub and it can set itself on fire!

Call and ask for Larry or Mike, http://www.raka.com/ , at 772-489-4070.

A bunch of us, including a friend who works on wood boats, switched to Raka epoxy from West Systems and we're getting equal results at 1/2 to 2/3rds the price! For any hobbyiest (sp?)... their ~$20 sample kit is a MUST HAVE purchase! They're in FL and I'm up north in MA and I get my orders delivered in 2-3 days.

Nice build =D> by the way!



_________________
#1) 1st tin rebuild, 18' Lund viewtopic.php?f=21&t=36583
#2) 25' Parker refurb from EMPTY hull http://www.classicparker.com/phpBB3/vie ... p?f=15&t=6
#3) 16' V-tin rebuild viewtopic.php?f=21&t=36465
#4 Procraft SV14
#5) 16' Starcraft entirely NEW Transom Skins viewtopic.php?f=3&t=37548
Online
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2016, 14:48 
Donor
User avatar

Joined: 02 Mar 2014, 19:52
Posts: 3193
Location: Central FLORIDA - The Sunshine State -
Dowellz - what are you going to epoxy??

there was about 4 threads in the last couple of weeks about
sealing and painting decks, floors and transoms.
Several views and opinions on sealing any wood project.
different types of wood require different sealing methods and products.

when you get to one specific project, that is when to ask your specific questions.
for the transom - the general consensus is to glue your 3/4" plywood panels
together first. The next day, make a cardboard template and cut your transom to size.
sand all edges and flat sides. sand off the sharp corner edges - (they don't hold coatings very well).
then, your choice of sealing and finishing methods..........
apply the same number of coats of anything to the wood for best results.
not 3 coats on the front and one coat on the back.
plywood edges are the most vulnerable to moisture penetration . . . . preserve them well.
good luck in your journey !!

Dale has wooed me over to "the dark side" with Raka Epoxy.
I have been a die hard West System user for 40 years and I must say that
I like the Raka better - Thanks Dale !!



_________________
http://www.tinboats.net/how-to-build-a-transom/
http://www.tinboats.net/varnish-vs-polyurethane/
All about Primers = http://www.tinboats.net/primer-and-paint-basics/
Paint, Thinners and Applications = http://www.paintingforpainters.com/

1959 Crestliner Commodore 14'
1959 Lone Star Malibu 14'
1958 Johnson 35 RDE-19 Sea Horse
1958 Johnson 35 RDS-20 Super Sea Horse
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2016, 17:38 

Joined: 04 Aug 2016, 08:54
Posts: 32
Thanks gonefishin for the tip. A quick search of spar and there are plenty of people that use it with success. And the fact I can get it locally is a plus!

I'm thinking I will put a piece of wood on the outside of the transom. I like the idea of strength, so I think I am gonna put a piece of the marine grade plywood on there and seal it up with the same spar urethane. Depending on how it looks with just sealer I might paint the outside piece black.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2016, 19:24 

Joined: 10 Jan 2015, 22:17
Posts: 127
One thing with spar is it needs to be covered i believe. As in not uv resistant. So where ever you use it it should be painted, vynled or carpeted.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2016, 19:50 
Donor
User avatar

Joined: 02 Mar 2014, 19:52
Posts: 3193
Location: Central FLORIDA - The Sunshine State -
GoneFishin - quite the opposite......

Spar varnishes are typically designed to not only protect the wood,
but also give it the flexibility and UV protection it needs to last for years.
And the name “spar" varnish comes from the boating world, where, on a sailboat,
the long wooden poles that support the sails are known as spars.
So a spar varnish needs to be one that can withstand the rigorous conditions
of the lake and ocean seafaring life.

Household Spar Varnishes typically have very little "true" UV inhibitors.
The frugal manufacturers will typically just have a few drops of the UV inhibitors
in the formula to comply with the truth in advertising regulations.
So their resistance to the harsh UV elements is not much better
than regular furniture varnish or polyurethane.

Marine Varnishes, which are far more expensive, do contain considerable amounts
of UV inhibitors. So if you need full UV protection, it would be in your best interest to seek out
the name brands that have the specified ingredients that your project requires.

The amount of varnishes and paints used in today’s world are often overwhelming to the average person.
If you are restoring a 1940 Chris-Craft mahogany runabout, you would want to use the highest quality of
materials available, regardless of cost.
If you are just replacing or refinishing a plywood transom or wood seats on a Jon Boat,
you really don’t need to spend $65.00 for a quart of paint or varnish when the more inexpensive coatings
will do the job just as well. Proper preparation before applying any coating will result in a more durable and favorable finish.
Bottom line is - you get what you pay for.

This is an excerpt from an article that I have written - - -
If anyone would like to read the full article, PM me and
I will send it to you in "doc" format.





.



_________________
http://www.tinboats.net/how-to-build-a-transom/
http://www.tinboats.net/varnish-vs-polyurethane/
All about Primers = http://www.tinboats.net/primer-and-paint-basics/
Paint, Thinners and Applications = http://www.paintingforpainters.com/

1959 Crestliner Commodore 14'
1959 Lone Star Malibu 14'
1958 Johnson 35 RDE-19 Sea Horse
1958 Johnson 35 RDS-20 Super Sea Horse
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2016, 21:33 

Joined: 10 Jan 2015, 22:17
Posts: 127
Johnny wrote:
GoneFishin - quite the opposite......

Spar varnishes are typically designed to not only protect the wood,
but also give it the flexibility and UV protection it needs to last for years.
And the name “spar" varnish comes from the boating world, where, on a sailboat,
the long wooden poles that support the sails are known as spars.
So a spar varnish needs to be one that can withstand the rigorous conditions
of the lake and ocean seafaring life.

Household Spar Varnishes typically have very little "true" UV inhibitors.
The frugal manufacturers will typically just have a few drops of the UV inhibitors
in the formula to comply with the truth in advertising regulations.
So their resistance to the harsh UV elements is not much better
than regular furniture varnish or polyurethane.


Marine Varnishes, which are far more expensive, do contain considerable amounts
of UV inhibitors. So if you need full UV protection, it would be in your best interest to seek out
the name brands that have the specified ingredients that your project requires.

The amount of varnishes and paints used in today’s world are often overwhelming to the average person.
If you are restoring a 1940 Chris-Craft mahogany runabout, you would want to use the highest quality of
materials available, regardless of cost.
If you are just replacing or refinishing a plywood transom or wood seats on a Jon Boat,
you really don’t need to spend $65.00 for a quart of paint or varnish when the more inexpensive coatings
will do the job just as well. Proper preparation before applying any coating will result in a more durable and favorable finish.
Bottom line is - you get what you pay for.

This is an excerpt from an article that I have written - - -
If anyone would like to read the full article, PM me and
I will send it to you in "doc" format.





.


Yup, I cant even remember how old I am but I know mid 30s. Guess I was thinking about the gluvit then. Good catch! Thats why I put the "I believe" clause in there! lol


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 17 Nov 2016, 11:45 

Joined: 04 Aug 2016, 08:54
Posts: 32
Here's a update for you guys. Finally got the interior ripped out. Looks like this is the second time it's been redone. The foam came out super easy. It had some white foam that I could only imagine was original. It was absolutely soaked. But the hull looks pretty clean otherwise. I water tested and only had a couple small leaks that should be taken care of when I gluvit. Picking up transom wood today and I will hopefully get that in over the weekend. Then it's time to flip it over and get the 3 different layers of paint off!!!

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 29 Nov 2016, 17:53 

Joined: 04 Aug 2016, 08:54
Posts: 32
Started cleaning the inside of the hull and getting it ready to gluvit then paint. Question for you guys, it appears that water should flow under each rib, but there is just to much dirt build up and I cannot clean it out good enough to get the water to flow, so without raising the boat further than what the jack can the water just sits between each rib. Wish I could cut some 3/8" or 1/2" holes in the ribs but I think that would take away from the strength of the ribs. Here is a pic. It's so shiny now!

Image


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 22 Feb 2017, 12:42 

Joined: 04 Aug 2016, 08:54
Posts: 32
Sorry for the lack of updates. Here are a bunch of progress photos. Enjoy!

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Had a friend come over and we welded half the boat. This guy put a ton of holes in this boat!!!

Image

Image

This was where the old battery gauge was for a trolling motor

Image

Image

Right side of boat is mostly done. Looks amazing if I say so myself!!

Image

More to come after this weekend!!!


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 23 Feb 2017, 18:11 

Joined: 04 Aug 2016, 08:54
Posts: 32
What do you think is a good size live well? Was thinking either 22 gallon or 33 gallon. Im having a buddy fabricate one from aluminum. If I went 3'x1'X1.5' it be 33 gallons. It might end up a taller, just dont know how tall yet. Plan on keeping all kinds of different fish in it. Catfish, bass, walleye and panfish.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 24 Feb 2017, 15:01 

Joined: 29 Jun 2016, 19:36
Posts: 624
Location: middle of NC
Nice work. Is it 16 ft and is it console steering? That's the type of boat I'd like someday cept maybe 14 ft and tiller.



_________________
16 ft Sea Nymph w/30 Johnson
14 ft Monark w/25 Merc XD sold
1994 Lowe 1605 w/50 Evinrude sold
14 ft Lone Star w/15hp Evinrude sold
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1978 Sylvan Restoration.
PostPosted: 27 Feb 2017, 15:25 

Joined: 04 Aug 2016, 08:54
Posts: 32
Yes it's a 16' Sylvan and also a console steer boat. Got all the welding done this weekend. Time to degrease the interior and start spraying primer. If all goes well, should be cutting foam and installing the floor this weekend. Need to order my carpet this week! The stripping and prepping of this boat has taken at least 3x as long as I would of guessed. If I ever do this again, I'm paying someone to sandblast it.


Offline
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 2 of 2 [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: toot and 60 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Join the free forum or login with your account and the annoying banner goes away

FishonFabrications