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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 19:39 

Joined: 09 Feb 2014, 20:15
Posts: 28
Location: OFALLON IL
I have a 14' Jon boat with a 6hp motor, and am in need of replacing and extending the front deck, and adding a deck on the back of the boat.
I have been watching some youtube videos on some other peoples work they have done and was just wondering if anyone had any recommendations for me. I saw some people use angle aluminum for the supports/framing, and others just used wood, guessing wood weighs more all together, opposed to the aluminum. Problem is I am limited on skills and tools. I do not have any rivet equipment, and do not have a whole lot of experience with self tapping screws. I am not really sure if I use angle aluminum if it will hold good and sturdy, or if the screws will just wobble loose. I dont want to spend the money of rivet stuff, assuming you need power tools, and i am guessing if hand tools are an option for rivets, it is probably still costly. I figure since this is my first time doing this rivets is a bad idea because i guarantee i am going to screw things up, and i want to be able to quickly and easily make adjustments.
A few questions

What would be the thinnest plywood i should use to be able to cut down on weight? i was going to use treated wood as well

Is outdoor rated carpet good enough, or do i really need to use marine grade carpet?

Where can I get marine carpet by the square foot, if marine is necessary? The marina by me only sells carpet in huge sections and it is $300 dollars, no way I am paying that much!

The front of my boat has a metal enclosed lip on the inside of the boat about 1' or so from front to back, that is what the front of the deck is resting on. The back of the front deck is screwed into a frame the previous owner made out of aluminum and wood. Basically i am replacing the plywood, but extending the new deck to the back of my middle metal bench seat. The space between the frame he built and the bench seat is going to be storage, and i am also cutting out a storage area over the main part of the front deck. Biggest issue I have is how to secure the front of the deck to the boat, currently it is just sitting there, and I hate that because it is cutting up the trolling motor cables and the front light. He drilled holes in the front lip to run the wiring up to the front of the boat. I will cut bigger holes and protect the sharp edges, but i still want the deck secured up front. i was thinking maybe take some 2x4 pieces and screw them to the metal lip with brackets, and then just screw the deck directly to the 2x4 pieces. I just dont like the idea of having to put screws through a newly carpeted deck. Wondering if there are other methods I do not know about.

As far as the back of the boat, I am really not sure how to secure the plywood to the very back of the boat, i am covering the bench seat and using the back of the bench seat as my pivot point for the hinge for the doors that will cover the gas can and battery.

Anyways that is a lot to read, but I am sure somebody out there likes to be really helpful.
Looking for some dos and dont's and some advice on material and where to get it, and methods of framing.
If anyone has links, or videos or pictures they would like to add I could take a look.


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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 20:28 

Joined: 05 Oct 2008, 12:14
Posts: 4131
Location: Algonquin Il
1/2" exterior grade plywood is good if there is proper support.
Never use pressure treated wood on an aluminum boat.



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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 20:38 
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Joined: 27 Nov 2010, 09:36
Posts: 4430
Location: Houston, TX & Crossville, TN
14 ft boat...6 hp motor....."adding a deck onto the back"

As was said above NEVER use treated lumber on an aluminum boat.

Adding a stern deck may weigh too much and kill any opportunity to get her up on plane. At the very least, calculate the expected added weight and fill some 5 gallon buckets up with water (about 42 lbs per 5 gallon bucket). Ride around for a while with the buckets in the stern. Be certain to tie the buckets down tightly.

Using screws, rather than rivets, is fine to stick down the front deck. Rivets were made for a reason and they do a fantastic job, but do what you do best. It is your boat.

richg99



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 Post subject: Re: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 20:46 

Joined: 06 Jan 2015, 18:39
Posts: 269
Sealed end pop rivets from eBay are easy and cheap. I did a deck from wood and the cons with it that I've found are what you stated above. Mainly, it's heavy. I'll be going with aluminum covered with tuff coat paint. A sheet of .125 4x8 cost me 75 bucks and reinforced with 1x1 .125 angle will help to seriously cut the weight and drastically improve my function, as it's mainly a duck boat and the wood would keep me worried

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 Post subject: Re: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 20:47 

Joined: 06 Jan 2015, 18:39
Posts: 269
All in all, good luck. It's not too difficult if you have common sense and premeditate a plan. Take your time, don't rush, and anyone could do it. Sift through these forums until you're comfortable.

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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 22:30 

Joined: 09 Feb 2014, 20:15
Posts: 28
Location: OFALLON IL
richg99 wrote:
14 ft boat...6 hp motor....."adding a deck onto the back"

As was said above NEVER use treated lumber on an aluminum boat.

Adding a stern deck may weigh too much and kill any opportunity to get her up on plane. At the very least, calculate the expected added weight and fill some 5 gallon buckets up with water (about 42 lbs per 5 gallon bucket). Ride around for a while with the buckets in the stern. Be certain to tie the buckets down tightly.

Using screws, rather than rivets, is fine to stick down the front deck. Rivets were made for a reason and they do a fantastic job, but do what you do best. It is your boat.

richg99


Rich, I kind of have a feeling you did a decking project and then realized you were going to be going motor shopping!
I am in the market for a jet drive motor since I just moved to the Saint Louis area, there are some really good smallmouth rivers southwest of the city about an hr or so. There are not many lakes around here I care to fish very much, so the jet drive will be my main motor regardless of where I go, so my current motor hp is not overly pressing. That is a good idea though to take it out and weight it down to see what I am dealing with. I am not really sure that two pieces of plywood and and some angle aluminum will weight 80 lbs though.


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 Post subject: Re: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 22:35 

Joined: 09 Feb 2014, 20:15
Posts: 28
Location: OFALLON IL
derekdiruz wrote:
Sealed end pop rivets from eBay are easy and cheap. I did a deck from wood and the cons with it that I've found are what you stated above. Mainly, it's heavy. I'll be going with aluminum covered with tuff coat paint. A sheet of .125 4x8 cost me 75 bucks and reinforced with 1x1 .125 angle will help to seriously cut the weight and drastically improve my function, as it's mainly a duck boat and the wood would keep me worried

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk


I wanted to use the angle aluminum for framing and use plywood for the deck.
Do you need an air compressor for rivets, or can you use a hand tool?
If I screw up is it real hard to remove the rivets?
How much $$ would I be looking at for a gun and rivets, not sure what all else is necessary to do rivets.
All the framing people do looks so nice and sturdy and clean with angle aluminum.
The wood frames look all clunky and sloppy, and probably dont last as long, takes up too much space and weighs too much.


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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 22:43 

Joined: 09 Feb 2014, 20:15
Posts: 28
Location: OFALLON IL
lckstckn2smknbrls wrote:
1/2" exterior grade plywood is good if there is proper support.
Never use pressure treated wood on an aluminum boat.



Crap! Just bought a pressure treated 2x4 for my bunk boards. Should I return it, or am I ok with the carpet being over it?
There must be some nasty chemicals in that treated wood, my head was spinning as to what to use with treated wood, as far as staples, nuts, bots, etc................ Does the pressure wood react that badly with metals?????? Why do they even make it if it destroys everything it touches?????????

I will never be on saltwater, at least not in the plans............Am I ok with just using whatever hardware I want for the deck and mounting various devices?????? If I buy exterior grade plywood do I still need to treat it or anything or is it good to go?

I am a motor and car guy, I have done little to no wood/carpet/framing work, except for laying down some tile, and carpeting for a few summers for some side cash.


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 Post subject: Re: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2016, 23:06 

Joined: 06 Jan 2015, 18:39
Posts: 269
Pop rivets are just done with a 15 dollar tool from home depot. Sealed ends cheap and will keep it from leaking if sealed with 5200 3m. If you mess em up, just drill em out. Easy peasy

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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 20 Jul 2016, 22:36 

Joined: 20 Jul 2016, 10:51
Posts: 36
justin sumner wrote:
lckstckn2smknbrls wrote:
1/2" exterior grade plywood is good if there is proper support.
Never use pressure treated wood on an aluminum boat.



Crap! Just bought a pressure treated 2x4 for my bunk boards. Should I return it, or am I ok with the carpet being over it?
There must be some nasty chemicals in that treated wood, my head was spinning as to what to use with treated wood, as far as staples, nuts, bots, etc................ Does the pressure wood react that badly with metals?????? Why do they even make it if it destroys everything it touches?????????

I will never be on saltwater, at least not in the plans............Am I ok with just using whatever hardware I want for the deck and mounting various devices?????? If I buy exterior grade plywood do I still need to treat it or anything or is it good to go?

I am a motor and car guy, I have done little to no wood/carpet/framing work, except for laying down some tile, and carpeting for a few summers for some side cash.


If the boat is painted you'll be fine with the pressure treated, it only becomes an issue if you have an unpainted aluminum jon boat. Its possible it could eat up the aluminum if it comes in contact with unpainted aluminum. I personally had a deck on my painted jon boat that was framed out with pressure treated lumber and have no issues to this day.



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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 20 Jul 2016, 23:04 
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Joined: 27 Nov 2010, 09:36
Posts: 4430
Location: Houston, TX & Crossville, TN
If you think a thin coat of paint will protect your boat... You may well be mistaken. Electrolysis is incidious. Why risk it?

richg99
p. s. It doesn't happen overnight.

http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-for ... -boat.html


Last edited by richg99 on 21 Jul 2016, 07:03, edited 1 time in total.


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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 20 Jul 2016, 23:22 

Joined: 09 Feb 2014, 20:15
Posts: 28
Location: OFALLON IL
Well I have decided I am going to attempt to buy some angle aluminum for framing out my front and back decks. I will also be attempting to use rivets for the first time. I am a little uncertain as to what method to use to be sure my supports are the same height from the front of the boat to the back of the first bench seat, which is where my deck will end.

My initial thoughts are to try to level out my boat on the trailer as best i can with a level, then just try to match all of my additional framing to the frame that is already built. I just am not sure how to tell for sure that the frames that I am making will match the frame that is in the boat already. I guess you just eyeball up the new frame as best you can, and run something flat and level from frame to frame, and adjust until your level balances out. Measure and mark and rivet I guess.

I think the deck that is on the boat is 3/4" and there is no framing inbetween the front of the boat and the frame he built for the back of the front deck. I was looking at some plywood today that was outdoor rated, it was about $25 bucks a sheet, the 3/4" was very heavy so I think i will downgrade to 1/2" since my deck will be larger, and I am adding a rear deck. I am hoping 1/2" is good enough, just a little worried about the spots I am going to use to mount my seat post on the front, and also the spots I am putting my storage compartments. I am thinking i will be fine if i just screw some sort of brace to the bottom of the doors and seat post sp

I would consider abandoning wood all together and go all aluminum all together, but I am not sure if that would be me getting in over my head, which I already feel like I am doing by even starting this project in the first place. Does anyone know how I would mount the aluminum deck to my supports, and also how the heck do you mount things like trolling motor, depth finder, seat post base, rod holders etc etc. I would still want it carpeted, no idea what hardware to use.

I am going to be asking a million questions on here, and really need a lot of direction. I would like to post pictures, but i could not even figure out how to put an avatar on here, it kept saying all of my pictures were too large. I dont know how else to select files other than to email pictures to myself, save it to the computer, and add it on here. AAAAAnd that is not working well!


boat.jpg


Last edited by justin sumner on 20 Jul 2016, 23:46, edited 3 times in total.
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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 20 Jul 2016, 23:30 

Joined: 09 Feb 2014, 20:15
Posts: 28
Location: OFALLON IL
richg99 wrote:
If you think a thin coat of paint will protect your boat... You may well be mistaken. Electrolysis is pervasive. Why risk it?

richg99
p. s. It doesn't happen overnight.

http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-for ... -boat.html


I did a little more research on the chemicals and treated wood, I returned the 2x4 and just got a regular one for my bunk boards.
I did not treat it or anything, but I did not carpet the wood all around, I left the bottom bare, I just have 2 bunks under the boat, 3' each, so it is not a big deal to me to not have the wood treated or anything. If I use 1/2" outdoor rated plywood for the decking, and I carpet it, do I need to use wood stain or something prior to carpeting. I have a little 2x4 chunk that i use to mount my trolling motor, and i wood stained it before mounting it, and it just seemed to wear off and not really be worth the money and effort to wood stain. That stuff is expensive, it was like 40 bucks for a can of it. Is there something else i should be using instead of wood stain that is cheaper, or am I ok just using the outdoor plywood as is. My boat is currently garage kept, and if I wind up living somewhere that i do not have access to a garage, I will build a pole barn, I also have a boat cover, so it will never be exposed to the elements while not in use.


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 Post subject: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 20 Jul 2016, 23:52 
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Joined: 27 Nov 2010, 09:36
Posts: 4430
Location: Houston, TX & Crossville, TN
Some good choices....

I wouldn't worry too much about your 2x4. You can see it. You can check it every time you go out. It is the hidden wood that rots.

Have fun. richg99



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“That which is measured improves. That which is measured and reported... improves exponentially.

Karl Pearson"
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 Post subject: Re: JON BOAT DECK JOB
PostPosted: 21 Jul 2016, 01:22 

Joined: 20 Jul 2016, 10:51
Posts: 36
richg99 wrote:
If you think a thin coat of paint will protect your boat... You may well be mistaken. Electrolysis is pervasive. Why risk it?

richg99
p. s. It doesn't happen overnight.

http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-for ... -boat.html


P.S it's the factory finish, which is baked on. And btw I've owned the boat 6 years, that's a little longer than overnight.


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